THE SPIRIT OF AIKIDO

THE SPIRIT OF AIKIDO

THE SPIRIT OF AIKIDO

  • By Bushido Admin

The Spirit of Aikido can be realized by looking at the roots of Aikido. The Spirit of Aikido, I think is very equal and interchangeable to Budo, which is: The way of the warrior based on a group of disciplines that cultivate the mind, body and spirit. It is this very same spirit within the warrior that drives the warriors of today’s training halls in Aikido.

The Spirit of Aikido can be realized by looking at the roots of Aikido. The Spirit of Aikido, I think is very equal and interchangeable to Budo, which is: The way of the warrior based on a group of disciplines that cultivate the mind, body and spirit. It is this very same spirit within the warrior that drives the warriors of today’s training halls in Aikido.

M. Ueshebia trained in various arts including Kenjutsu and Aikijijutsu, of which I think that modern day Aikido as it is known would have never made it without the impact of these two arts. Ueshebia trained with the Takeda family, which is where NGA has its roots from Master Morita. Ueshebia wanting to maintain the almost forgotten warrior methods used by the Samurai class in Feudal Japan developed the modern day style of Aikido, known as Hombu Aikido. Shodo Morita, also having trained with the same Aikijijutsu master as Ueshebia, it is no surprise to me at how similar the techniques are between the two styles, however have a great difference in philosophy. Master Morita developed a style of Aikido known as Nihon Goshin Aikido, which has both a hard and supple response and yet at the same time still maintains the Aiki spirit, which is harmony with the spirit of the attack. This hard response has a range of techniques that are suitable for many situations in today’s time. The supple as well, having a balance of both hard and supple techniques is what make NGA Aikido so inclusive. Ueshebias, style having been impacted greatly by his religion reflects a much different approach, in that it is said if Aikido is properly performed, that the aggressor will not be harmed. The fact is that both of these arts have been developed around the core principles of Aikijutsu, the art of being in harmony with the spirit, the spirit of the attack.

The art being developed by true masters of war, having seen and lived in war, seeing the great affect of such an art poured them selves into the development of what we have today. Therein is the spirit of Aikido, the continual pouring out of ones self into refining his heart, his soul and his life, to reach a higher standard for living. I know very little of Master Morita, but what I know is that he trained with Master Takeda and was a very skilled proponent of the art, having developed Nihon Goshin Aikido, the art speaks for the great knowledge he possessed. Master Bowe also having trained with Master Morita is directly reflected upon his own success in the art, being featured in the black belt magazine in 69, having lead 20 dojos in the U.S. and reproducing hundreds of Yundansha across the northeast and southeast. Likewise I have never trained with M.ueshebia, but I see the volumes of information written about him and his efforts at developing Aikido. Knowing that he trained with the same master of Aikijutsu, as did our founder of NGA is enough for me. These men grasped something very powerful from Master Takeda, the spirit of Aikido and have successfully passed this on to their pupils, which have impacted the lives of many people. It is a passion for the warrior code, a love of mastering the art to such a degree that we are no longer bound by fear of what the unknown brings toward us. We train so that we are prepared for the unexpected and are able to blend with any given situation; the effect of this is peace as we harmonize with life. We have learned from those who have gone before us and we seek to become as rooted and grounded as these warriors through continually improving upon or mental, spiritual and physical abilities in and out of the dojo.